Paseo Caribe Mural Project
Let us now celebrate the working men and women of Puerto Rico. A four part mural depicting the workers from old San Juan to the beaches and rainforest. By muralist Tom Christopher and team including students from Escuela de Arte Plasticas at Paseo Caribe.

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The scaffold has been removed, almost ready for public viewing. It officially opened at Paseo Caribe, San Juan, Puerto Rico on October 24 , 2016.

A story of people working, going to work, the honor and pride of jobs well done, all in the beautiful light and the brilliant colors of Puerto Rico.

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Close up of brush work on a mural for Paseo Caribe in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Mural

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Sweeper guy at old San Juan capitol building, with cat (cats everywhere) construction crew at housing project, mom jogging with baby carriage in streets of Old San Juan, the famous old tree in Colon Plaza, guitar player with tip jar, woman from sunglasses store, motorcycle delivery boy, soccer club training at El Morro, lawn maintenance guys, poetress with doves at Plaza de Armas. El Jefe with briefcase full of money, getting of city bus. Fashion model running to catch bus.

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The theme of this mural is the rural area. El Yunque rainforest tour-guide (with girls taking a selfie) plantation workers filling out Friday time cards, race horse being put through paces, flower vendor, chef and sous chef, moonlight through the palms.

Expressionistic mural of Puerto Rico

Architect at drafting table, drone camera man (small), UPS man, office workers from Hato Rey, Caesar, the bartender from Morton's, fruit vendor, factory girl (in bandana,) gas welder, El Moro with taxis, linotype operator in Santurce, workers putting up huge scaffolding tent.

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Swimming instructor loads up on swim fins, kite surfers rip through the air above her, two guys trotting out towels, another wrestles chaise-longue chairs, a woman brings out a Flamboyan Tree on a serving tray as a pool guy hovers the shallow end.

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 Artist and muralist Tom Christopher will be working with art students from Escuela de Artes Plásticas y Diseño to create more than 3,600 square feet of murals in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico.

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article from El Nuevo Dia on puerto rico mural by Tom Christpher

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Tom Christopher is a classically trained draughtsman. He received a BFA from the Art Center College in Los Angeles, studying with the legendary Disney animator Ward Kimball and the painter Lorser Fietelson. He then worked for Peterson Publishing, drawing automobiles for Motor Trend Magazine; created rock posters for CBS Records; and drew portraits at Disneyland. After moving to New York in 1981, Christopher covered courtroom drama for CBS News in downtown Manhattan. This experience, in part, formed the foundation for a narrative and journalistic approach to his art. Although born in Hollywood, and steeped in the LA hot rod/skateboard culture, Christopher became obsessed with painting household objects and tools on a Brobdingnagian scale, exhibiting in galleries in the East Village. He would always carry a sketchbook, endlessly drawing and recording everything from subways to skyscrapers.

Now, Christopher's subject matter is largely focused on the streets of New York.  However, calling him a New York painter would be as much a mistake as calling Kirchner a Berlin city scene painter. They have both used the subject of the city as a launching pad to explore the many aspects of man's struggle in an urban environment.  This theme is universal, as Christopher's paintings have found a following worldwide. Most of Christopher's work is painted using small batch, handmade acrylic paint. Pencil lines from the initial exploratory sketch stage often remain on the white canvas. These raw areas give the painting both breathing room and serve as a reminder of the process. His artistic vocabulary ranges from lines that loop and skit around to delicate watercolor washes, and from heavy brushwork to thick impasto with swirls and drips of color.

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